Posts Tagged ‘food’

Maybe you’ve noticed – people on low or no fat diets tend to remain fat or regain it quickly. Food fat issues are overrated. We need good fat to help build cell walls and brain cells.

Calorie sources and how they’re metabolized are the real issues. A more recent, more accurate assessment points to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). It is in almost all processed and junk foods, even those that don’t taste sweet.

Almost half the calories of HFCS are not used for energy. They’re stored as fat, and HFCS messes up the brain signals that let you know you’ve had enough to eat. So you’ll even eat more of foods with HFCS, and you’ll store up even more fat.

To a lesser extent, all highly refined carbohydrates contribute to this cycle. The trans-fat processed oils add to this inability to metabolize carbs for immediate energy by creating inflammation.

You’ll lose fat naturally by eliminating processed oils and HFCS, which are used in almost all processed and fast foods.

Supplements that can accelerate your weight loss campaign

L-Glutamine: Julia Ross, director of Recovery Systems Clinic in Mill Valley, recommends L-Glutamine to help eliminate cravings. “L-glutamine, an amino acid, instantly fuels the brain, which stops the code red that makes you crave sweets and starchy foods.”

A 1996 animal study at the Duke Medical Center indicated that L-Glutamine may alter how calories are transferred to inhibit fat storage. So more fat is used for energy instead of accumulating to puff you up.

Gymnema Syvelstre: This herb is derived from a plant that grows wild in Africa and India. It can be purchased as tablets or capsules. Its molecules mimic glucose and fool the taste bud receptors on the tongue enough to convince people they have had enough sugar.

A study published in 1983 in the journal Physiology and Behavior discovered that people using gymnema had less cravings for sweets and didn’t binge even when the opportunity presented itself.

Boost your metabolism and burn fat faster

Drinking cold water and/or taking cold showers seem to bring out brown fat or brown adipose tissue (BAT). Unlike white fat that just hangs around, BAT is metabolically active and can actually be utilized for energy immediately.

A healthy thyroid is important. Most people who have problems losing weight are lacking the proper balance of thyroid hormones. Supplementing the thyroid with its main food, iodine/iodide, may be the first option.

There are also thyroid supplements that will enhance your thyroid hormone production. It’s wise to consult with a health practitioner who is nutrition savvy regarding hormones.

Most of us are magnesium deficient. Magnesium is often considered the master mineral because it’s involved in over 300 cellular metabolic processes. Unfortunately, magnesium is not easily absorbed as an oral supplement.

Green tea extracts: A 2005 human study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition proved that high daily amounts of the fat burning catechins found in green tea increased fat loss.

The green tea extracts offer catechins more efficiently than drinking green tea. Green tea extracts have also been observed to reduce cancerous tumors.

Guggul is an Ayurvedic herbal remedy for joint pain. But a study using guggul during combined weight training and aerobic exercise increased weight loss five-fold compared to those who trained but didn’t take guggul.

A diet comprised largely of unprocessed organic veggies and fruits will help you from regaining what you’ve lost.

Sources for this article include:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NAH/is_7_38/ai_n27889683/

http://www.outsmarthormones.com/2010/12/22/cold-boost-metabolism/

http://www.naturalnews.com/033356_junk_food_cravings.html

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Almonds, salmon, blueberries and 17 more foods that will make you more alert, energetic and ready to take on the world.

It’s three in the afternoon, your energy is flagging and all you want to do is take a nap, but instead you have to sit through a boring meeting. While you could just have a second – or seventh – cup of coffee, you could also have some pumpkin seeds, an apple, a few red bell pepper slices with hummus or a piece of dark chocolate. These 20 foods can help relieve fatigue, sharpen your focus and give you the jolt of energy that you need to avoid falling asleep at your desk.

Leafy Greens

Spinach, kale, arugula and chard. Virtually every variety of leafy greens is flavorful, packed with vitamins and minerals, and a low-calorie addition to your meals. Not only do they contain vitamins C and A, which are important for energy levels, they also contain depression-fighting folate.

 

Nuts

Nuts like almonds, walnuts, pecans and cashews contain protein for endurance and coenzyme Q10, a nutrient that helps produce energy inside our cells. This combination makes them an ideal fuel choice for both a quick energy jolt and long-term endurance.

Lean Meats

Skinless chicken, turkey and other lean cuts of meat contain the amino acid tyrosine, which helps fight fatigue. They also have lots of iron, B-vitamins and the protein your muscles need for endurance whether you’re working out, competing in an athletic event or just trying to get through a hectic day.

Salmon

Salmon has two grams of essential fatty acids per four-ounce serving, and these EFAs do more than just regulate insulin and facilitate healthy brain function. They also help ease inflammation, so stiffness in your joints or muscles won’t slow you down.

Eggs

There are plenty of foods that provide the protein vegetarians need, but perhaps none do so in such a powerful, compact package as an egg. Eggs offer many of the same benefits as lean meats, including protein, B-vitamins and iron.

Whole Grains

It’s common knowledge that consuming carbs will give you a quick energy boost, which makes them great before a long workout. But the pick-me-up from refined carbohydrates like white bread and white rice won’t last; within 30 minutes you’ll be feeling sluggish again. Choose refined carbs like brown rice, oats or whole-wheat bread instead.

Coffee

This one’s a no-brainer. The caffeine in coffee is perhaps the most powerful and well-known energy-booster there is, and millions of people rely on it every morning just to get out the door. But when you combine some of these other pick-me-up foods in each of your daily meals, you may find you don’t need coffee as much as you used to.

Tea

Like coffee, black tea and green tea both contain caffeine, but they’ve also got the amino acid L-theanine, which can aid in alertness and memory.

Beans

Lean protein, iron, B-vitamins and amino acids make beans an obvious go-to for energy, but another big benefit comes from their fiber content. Fiber slows digestion, giving your body a longer-term source of energy.

Apples

Fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants have a lot of energy-boosting power on their own, but apples also contain fructose, which is quickly and efficiently processed by our bodies for energy.

Bananas

A favorite of bodybuilders, bananas offer potassium, which helps muscles contract properly, as well as the fruit sugars fructose and glucose. Glucose is rapidly digested and turned into energy, so that you’ll start feeling more alert right away.

Pumpkin seeds

Like nuts, pumpkin seeds contain muscle-sustaining protein, vitamins and healthy fats. They’re also full of magnesium, which helps convert food into energy.

Water with lemon

When you’re feeling a little slow, take the time to drink a glass of water, preferably with a slice of lemon for a little bit of added vitamin C. Dehydration can sap both metabolism and energy levels. Try coconut water, too, which contains electrolytes and potassium.

Watermelon

It may seem like mostly – well – water, but watermelon is a surprisingly good source of energy-boosting B-vitamins, potassium and fructose. And thanks to its high water content, it’s hydrating, too.

Blueberries

Blueberries are often listed among so-called “superfoods” for a reason. Antioxidants in blueberries can help improve cognition, and were even found to have an anti-aging effect in a  2007 study on rats. Pair them with walnuts, which are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, and you’ve got ideal brain food.

Red Bell Peppers

You can get 380% of your daily recommended value of vitamin C just by eating one red bell pepper. Vitamin C helps the healing process, so your body feels less fatigued.It also contains the phytochemical lycopene, fiber and vitamin B6.

Dark Chocolate

Not only does dark chocolate boost metabolism by lowering stress levels, it also increases alertness and sharpens cognitive skills for a short-term period after eating it. A study found that flavanols in dark chocolate increase blood flow to key areas of the brain for two to three hours, helping to fight fatigue.

Low-Fat Yogurt

The same amino acid that makes lean meat such a good choice for relieving fatigue and sluggishness can also be found in yogurt. Choose fat-free or low-fat greek yogurt to eliminate added sugar and get even more protein.

Green Smoothies

Take the energy-packing power of leafy greens, greek yogurt, apples and bananas, and combine it with any other fruits you like, and you’ve got a wake-up call in a glass. Spinach and kale are favorites for green smoothies because their mild flavor is masked or even complemented by the flavors of the fruit.

Hummus

Hummus combines the protein of chickpeas and sesame-based tahini with vitamin-C-packed lemon juice and the essential fatty acids in olive oil. Eat it with strips of red bell pepper and some baby carrots for triple benefits.

 If you have never considered growing your own fruits,

vegetables and herbs, here are 10 reasons to start now.

1. Gardening is delicious. Homegrown produce, especially juicy tomatoes and fresh basil, are usually tastier than when store-bought. Plant what your family likes to eat and enjoy the rave reviews.

2. Gardening is good exercise. Pulling weeds, digging holes and hauling dirt burns calories comparable to brisk walking. It also challenges and tones both lower and upper body muscles.

3. Gardening is good for children. They can learn the science of seeds and plants. They can learn planning and researching skills by deciding what and where to plant, and what each plant’s water, sun and nutrition needs are. They are also motivated to eat healthier foods. This whole process teaches patience in today’s era of immediate gratification.

4. Gardening relieves stress. The emotional benefits of gardening are so well known that horticulture therapy has sprung up: horticulture therapists prescribe gardening to help people sleep better, reduce anxiety and boost mood levels.

5. Gardening helps you prepare for potential food shortages. During these days of extreme economic uncertainty and worldwide crop shortages, planting your own food supply could be crucial for your family’s survival.

6. Gardening is easier than you think. Just like learning to drive, going to college or having children, gardening can be overwhelming at first, but once you go up the learning curve, it becomes much easier.

7. Gardening makes it easy to eat organic. By avoiding pesticides and chemical fertilizers, it is simple to grow organic food.

8. Gardening makes it easy to eat locally. Harvesting sweet bell peppers from your backyard uses no fuel to transport the finished product to your kitchen. This is quite different than store-bought peppers that traveled from Canada, Holland or Israel.

9. Gardening may be cheaper than store-bought. After some initial investment in tools, seeds and soil amendments, the cost of home-grown produce is often cheaper than store bought. By composting scraps to make your own fertilizer, subsequent year costs can be limited to new seeds and seedlings. And by learning the art of seed saving, this cost can also be avoided.

10. Gardening has withstood the test of time. For its history mankind has depended on gardening to sustain itself; the decline of growing one’s own food has paralleled the decline of our nation’s health and overall welfare.

Conclusion
Enjoy National Gardening Month by starting your own garden now. You will reap physical, emotional, financial and intellectual benefits, as well as know exactly where your food is coming from.

Sources
National Gardening Month: http://www.nationalgardenmonth.org/

Gardening is good exercise:
http://www.marthastewart.com/article/reap-the-benefits-of-gardening

Gardening is good for children:
Overview at http://www.childrenandnature.org/news/detail/fact_sheet_summarizes_be…
Detailed reports at: http://www.childrenandnature.org/research/

Gardening relieves stress:
http://www.rodale.com/benefits-gardening?page=0%2C4
http://www.rodale.com/horticultural-therapy
http://www.rodale.com/houseplant-propagation

Need to prepare for potential food shortages:
http://www.newclearvision.com/2011/04/05/garden-like-your-life-depend…
http://www.dailyfinance.com/story/investing/are-food-shortages-on-the…

Excellent resource for organic gardening:
http://www.organicgardening.com/

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032106_National_Gardening_Month_April.html#ixzz209ZtuMKW